Scholarships For Men Over 40 – A Short Guide to Help You

By being aware of how to get scholarships and grants for single fathers it is really easy to get a scholarship for men over 40. If you apply, you will surely get the necessary funds for your education. These scholarships are literally $10,000 for free, coming from the government to help your education. Financial aid for fathers has now become a reality!

After you made your decision to apply for one of the many scholarships available, you’ll need the application mailed to you or personally go and take it from the office of that university of your choice. Getting there is not difficult, but you should follow all the steps. This article describes these steps. Obama scholarships for fathers are meant to help single fathers raising children have a decent job and a stable income.

1. Read the directions. Well, it is interesting to know, that some of the scholarships will ask for you educational experience and GPA, while others will require you to describe yourself. If you fill out more of these at a time, you should always pay attention, not to include too much or too little of what they asked for.

2. Sometimes, you need to list:

A. Why you want this scholarship

B. What Majors are you thinking of

C. How long your education could be, how long to graduate.

3. Save copies, so you can always know what you applied for. Maybe the school of your choice simply won’t have the good information to give that scholarship, so you may find it useful to search on the internet. So many databases are out there to help you, so you can easily find anything you need and even find directions for applying.

4. Send the application by Registered Mail – You may opt for mailing the application, so you really need to know it was received, and you will also know when to contact that university again.

This is just what every single working dad needs, even more if children are to be raised. There is no time to waste, take advantage!

US Education Sector: A Detailed Review

The USA prides itself as having one of the top nations with the most effective and functional educational systems. The US has been consistently working towards the improvement of the country’s education-related initiatives.

The government has consolidated programs that not only offer federal loans, but it also includes academic grants to eligible scholars who attempt to continue their schooling and acquire a degree in a certain field of expertise.

In order to constantly ensure the correct consolidation of these initiatives, the U. S. government has established several agencies which are intended solely for the administration of education-related initiatives.

First up is the U. S. Department of Education, most commonly referred to as the ED or USED. The agency, established in October of 1979, was built to ensure that efficient channels are present in terms the administration and consolidation of educational laws, policies, programs, and initiatives.

The mission of the Department of Education is to”establish policy for, administer and coordinate most federal help to education, collect data on US schools, and to impose federal educational laws relating to privacy and civil rights.”

For more specific concerns, the Department of Education has established a few sub-agencies or divisions, namely:

a) Institute of Education Sciences – This division was created as a part of Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002 and is the primary research arm of the United States Department of Education.

b) Federal Student Aid (FSA) – This division of the ED is the largest provider of financial aid in the United States in the form of grants, loans, and work-study funds. The mission of the FSA is to”ensure that all qualified Americans benefit from federal financial assistance grants, loans and work-study programs for education beyond high school.”

In the year 2011, the FSA was reported to administer roughly $144 billion to almost 15 million postsecondary students and their respected families.

c) National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) – This agency is operating under the United States Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences and it’s primarily tasked to gather, investigate, and share statistical data on education and public school district finance data all over the United States of America.

d) Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) – Another program of the ED that has continually been aiming at achieving its major agency mission which is to”to provide leadership to reach full integration and collusion in society of people with incapacities by guaranteeing equal opportunity and access to, and excellence in, education, employment and community living.

I Love My Kids, But I Never Got Around To Saving For Their College – Now They Are In High School

I always thought about starting a college fund. I even set up a small savings account when they were born. Now they are in high school, time is running out and I am starting to panic. What can I do? Where should I start? Are they going to hate me? I really wish I had started earlier.

Get Started: As their guidance counselors, teachers and friends are helping them evaluate their strengths and weaknesses in an effort to narrow down their career options, you need to take action now if they are going to make it to college. Here is how to begin.

Relax: Your first step is to take a deep breath and realize that you are starting late. You can’t change the past, but you can take positive action to change the future. The fact that you are reading this article tells me that you are ready to make an effort to help your children as much as possible. It will take some time and effort on your part, but you WILL make progress one step at a time.

Follow These Steps: The following steps will get you started on a nice structured path. You will start a journey that will take you from where you are now, through to the college graduation of your youngest child. It will not be easy or without some sacrifices, but if you do it right, it will be fun and your children will appreciate your efforts.

Step 1 – Family Net Worth: Prepare a current Net Worth Statement so you can see where you stand right now. This is a financial snap shot that will show your assets and liabilities as of today. (You can find a free one-page net worth statement on our site listed at the end of this article – forms section – or by searching the internet.) Once you know where you are today, every positive step you take will improve your net worth and help your efforts to send your children to college.

Step 2 – Maximize Income: Now that your children are all in school, consider maximizing your earning and saving potential. If one spouse was the primary care giver for the children, maybe they were working part-time or not working outside the house. Consider having both spouses work full-time to add extra income into the family budget. These increased earnings can be directed specifically into college savings, but make sure you put them in the right type of accounts.

Step 3 – Talk To Your Kids: Discuss college and financial aid with your children now. Review the costs associated with community colleges, state universities and private colleges. Let them know that you may be late to the game, but you are trying to help them as much as you possibly can. Depending on your family size, income and assets, you can get an estimate of your expected family contributions by using one of the online EFC calculators. Once you and your children are aware of these estimates, you can begin looking into your best college alternatives.

Step 4 – Let Them Help: Finally, encourage and help your children to become more “Financial Aid Worthy” students. By doing the right things while they are in high school and positioning your assets properly, you can help them by qualifying for more financial aid and learning how to further reduce college costs.

Keep Moving Forward: The most important point to remember is that even small steps will help, so if hitting a college financial “Home Run” isn’t possible, a solid single or even a bunt will help your cause. Every little bit helps and if you keep moving forward in your efforts to narrow the college funding gap, your children will see your efforts and be that much better off.

In Summary: Don’t beat yourself up. You are in the same boat as plenty of other American families. Your kids won’t hate you, but taking the first steps now will help substantially. Talk with your children and give them realistic expectations about what you can and can’t do to help. Remember – Where there is a will… there is a way.

With the many options for college, students need to evaluate their own situation and decide which path is right for them. It will be easier if they know all the relevant details. They might surprise you, so encourage them and help them to make good decisions.

To discover very specific ways to maximize your financial aid and reduce college costs, I have prepared a FREE College Cost Savings Kit which you can download by Clicking Here.

Please consider printing this article and sharing it with a friend. Many parents are in the same situation as you are. By paying it forward, you could help them save a lot of headaches and plenty of money too.

It’s Your Own Damn Fault You Are Paying So Much for Your Education

OK, maybe it’s not all your fault. Colleges themselves have something to do with the high cost, but it’s definitely because of your choices. Are you one of those individuals who complain about the high cost of your college education? Are you a graduate that gets depressed every time you have to make a ridiculously high student loan payment? If so, could you have done things differently and still received an excellent higher education?

According to the College Board, the average total published charges for full-time undergraduate students by type for 2013-2014 are as follows: Public Four-Year-In-State $18,391; Public Four-Year-Out-of-State $31,707; Private Nonprofit Four-Year $40,917. According to another study released by the Institute for College Access and Success (TICAS), the average debt incurred for student loans had climbed to $29,400 for the class of 2012. The 2013 figure is up by almost 10 percent compared to the group estimate the year before of $26,600. This shows an increase of an average of six percent each year from 2008 to 2012. When students and parents are looking for someone to blame for the high cost of their college education, they should look first to themselves and reflect on what they could have done differently. Here are some things to consider.

1. You could have studied harder.

As colleges compete to attract the brightest students to their school, they are prepared to offer the best deals possible including a full ride. Many colleges will offer additional grants and scholarships to high school graduates with high GPA, SAT, ACT scores; these are called Merit-Base Scholarships.

2. You could have gotten more involved.

Most college athletes are attending school on an athletics scholarship, however if you are not athletically gifted there are many other extracurricular activities you could have gotten evolved in. Some colleges and universities offer special grants and scholarships to students with particular talents. Music, journalism, drama and volunteering are a few categories for which these awards are made. In addition to schools providing scholarships to students with special interests, community and government organizations do as well.

3. You could have fought for more free aid.

Just completing the FAFSA is not enough; nor is it the only step in applying for financial aid. One hundred and fifty billion in financial aid is awarded to college students each year and over one million scholarships. There are scholarships based on athletic ability, academic merit, disability, race, nationality, religious affiliation, location, financial need and more. With a little research and patience, you could have found a long list of scholarships for which you are eligible even within your own school and community.

4. You could have chosen a school and major that offered you the best financial aid incentives.

How did you choose the college you applied for? The one with the best reputation, prestige, because that where your friends and family attended or maybe because you like their football tea? Maybe you attended where your boyfriend/girlfriend is going. However, a more responsible way would have been to select the school that offered you the best financial aid package.

When it comes to choosing a major, there can be many factors to think about. Studies have shown that most people don’t work in the field that their degree is in; it would have been financially smart to have chosen a major with the best financial aid incentive. Scholarships and grants vary by major, so with a little research you could have found a college and career field that was in need of people to fill them and offer several financial incentives to those who pursue a major within those fields.

5. You could have stayed in-state and off-campus.

A state college or university charges lower fees to state residents. Since public institutions are subsidized by state revenues, their tuition costs are lower than private schools’ costs. Here are the facts: A student living at home can save as much as $6,000 per year. Some students choose to attend a community college for one or two years, and then transfer to a four-year school. Tuition costs are substantially lower at community colleges than at four-year institutions.

6. You could have served in the U.S. Military.

The military offers many educational benefits that service members can take advantage of during or after service. Service members have access to benefits that range from financial aid and college funds to programs that convert military training into college credits. Here are some of those programs: Tuition Assistance, Post-9/11 GI Bill, College Fund Programs, Loan Repayment Programs, Service Members Opportunity Colleges (SOC), Community College of the Air Force (CCAF), Testing Programs plus others.

7. You could have asked your employer and/or parent’s employer for help.

Many employers offer Employer Tuition Assistance Programs to their employees and their families. Your employer may offer you up to $5,250 in employer education assistance benefits for undergraduate or graduate courses tax-free each year, per section 127 of the Internal Revenue Code. Another smart strategy would have been to get a job working for a college because many colleges offer tuition-free education to their employees.

8. You could have been strategic with your FAFSA to maximize your awards.

Studies have shown that one out of every seven FAFSA forms are completed incorrectly causing students to leave money on the table. In addition, many students never question their financial aid awards. Here are a few things you could have done wrong: you waited too long to complete the FAFSA or worse you did not fill it out at all, you kept assets in the student name, you overstated assets and income, you didn’t update the financial aid office when circumstances changed.

9. You could have saved on those expensive books.

You could have rented or bought used textbooks, sold your old book and reinvested the money for the next set. You could have borrowed, traded or teamed up with classmates to share the books or the cost. Doing so would have saved you thousands yearly.

10. You could have kept your grades up.

Almost all college funding are tied into your grades, each time you withdrew or failed a class it may have cost you to retake plus kept you in school longer which also cost you. If you did not meet your school Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy you would have lost or been at risk of losing your Federal Student Aid plus any other scholarships, military benefits and even employer assistance benefits.